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New York State Officially Prohibits High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing

  • Thu, 08/13/2015 - 4:50am
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DEC Issues Findings Statement Concluding Extensive Seven-Year Review

The state Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) today officially prohibited high-volume hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) in New York State by issuing its formal Findings Statement, completing the state’s seven-year review of this activity.

Legislature Slams Clean Water Act Reform

  • Tue, 06/24/2014 - 6:00pm
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The Greene County Legislature is fighting a proposed modification to the Clean Water Act that lawmakers say will burden farmers with “costly and time-consuming permitting and regulatory protocols,” according to a resolution passed last week.

The change was proposed in April by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with the stated intention of clarifying protections for streams and wetlands, which became confusing and complicated after Supreme Court decisions in 2001 and 2006.

New State Law Will Require Recycling of Mercury Thermostats

  • Sun, 12/29/2013 - 6:00pm
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Law Protects New Yorkers and the Environment by Ensuring Proper Handling of Hazardous Mercury

A new law signed by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo will require manufacturers to collect and recycle mercury-containing thermostats at no cost to consumers, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens announced today. The law implements a statewide thermostat product stewardship program to ensure that hazardous mercury is properly handled, preventing potential adverse health effects and damage to the environment.

Senate Clears Bill to Exempt Hydrants from New Lead Standards

  • Tue, 12/17/2013 - 6:00pm
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Taken from the  CQ Roll Call By Nathan Hurst

The Senate cleared legislation Tuesday to exempt fire hydrants from new lead-free requirements for drinking water systems scheduled to take effect in January.

The bill (HR 3588) was cleared for the president’s consideration by unanimous consent. The House passed the bill earlier this month, 384-0, under suspension of the rules.

House Passes Bill Exempting Fire Hydrants From New Lead Standards

  • Tue, 12/03/2013 - 6:00pm
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taken from the CQ Roll Call, written by Katey McGettrick

The House on Monday passed legislation that would exempt fire hydrants from new lead-free requirements for drinking water systems scheduled to go into effect in January.

The bill (HR 3588), passed 384-0 under suspension of the rules, would clarify that fire hydrants could be built with materials that do not meet the revised standards.

New York Rural Water Association Position on Ballot Proposition # 3

  • Wed, 10/30/2013 - 7:00pm
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Exclusion of Indebtedness Contracted for Sewage Facilities

Ballot propositions are too often overlooked by voters on Election Day. We urge voters to pay close attention to this proposition, and to vote yes on its adoption.

This measure would extend a provision of law which has been in effect since 1962, and renewed every ten years since, to exclude indebtedness for sewage facilities from their constitutional debt limits.

Summary of the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act and Frequently Asked Questions

  • Tue, 10/22/2013 - 6:00pm
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EPA has posted on its Web site a revised list of frequently-asked-questions to assist manufactures, retailers, regulators and the general public in complying with and understanding the requirements of the Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act. The FAQs address the definition of lead free, the effective date, calculating lead content, 3rdparty certification, product labeling, repair and replacement parts, and exemptions.

US Judge Rules on Possible NNC Plan

  • Wed, 09/25/2013 - 6:00pm
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Sept. 23) US judge gives EPA 6 months to decide whether regulations
needed for farmland runoff pollution
Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Environmental advocates in states along the Mississippi
River have won a round toward a long-term goal of having federal
standards created to regulate farmland runoff and other pollution
blamed for the oxygen-depleted “dead zone” in the Gulf of Mexico and
problems in other bodies of water.

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